CDL A Owner Operators – Davis Transport Inc

Freedom. Reliability. Ownership. Ask any flatbed trucker and those three traits are their primary focus when looking for flatbed owner operators. For more than 50 years, Davis Transport Inc., has been building relationships with their clients by putting safety and customer satisfaction first. Maintaining those standards takes quality flatbed owner operators who take pride in ownership and strive to reach safety and service goals with every truckload.

Our flatbed owner operators are successful at Davis Transport Inc. It doesn’t matter if you are a flatbed owner operator who is lease purchasing a truck for the third time, or first-time independent contractor looking to take the next step in your trucking career, Davis Transport Inc.’s flatbed owner operator program is here to help flatbed independent contractors set and reach their business goals. Participants in our owner operator program receive industry leading flatbed percentage pay.  As well as all of Davis Transport Inc.’s independent contractor benefits such as:

Our flatbed owner operators compensation is a leader in the industry.

    • Average 90% of gross invoice.
    • 100% pay on all accessorial charges including but not limited to 100% flatbed tarp pay, fuel surcharges and many more
    • Flatbed weekly settlements
    • LTL Freight
    • Non forced dispatch
    • Fuel discounts
    • Shop discounts
    • Tire discounts

Davis Transport has regional and OTR opportunities in your area.  We work hard to provide consistent home time while keeping your miles and revenue at high levels.  Our freight is very strong and our customer base includes Fortune 200 and 500 companies across the nation.  Our owner-operators have leading profits year over year.  By joining Davis Transport you will be taking your career and business to another level.  Join our family today.

PAY / BENEFITS

    • Percentage Pay – We pay on average 90% of every invoice.  Our top grossing owner-operators realize over $250,000 per year in gross revenue.
    • Fuel Surcharge – You will get paid FSC at Davis Transport.  We understand that fuel is a big expense to run your operations.
    • Stops, Tarps, Detention – These are paid at 100% to our owner-operator team.  For some of our customers this is a very large amount of money per trip.
    • Fuel Discounts – We have some of the best fuel discounts in the country and one of the largest networks of fuel stops.  We have a fuel App that gives up to date fuel prices daily and in real-time.
    • Shop Rates / Tire Rates – Our owner-operators get to utilize our shop at a rate of $50 per hour and get all parts at cost.  On average we save our owner-operator team $10,000 to $15,000 per month in repair bills.  We also have a full tire shop with exceptional pricing on tires.  Our install rate is also half of a tire shop.
    • Strong Freight – Our customer base largely consists of Fortune 200 and 500 companies.
    • Exceptional Insurance Rates – If you use our insurance our owner-operators save money and put more dollars in their pockets.
    • Home Time – We are committed to our driving team to get you home exactly when you need or want to be there.
    • Bonus – We offer a $2,500 sign-on bonus for every owner-operator.

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed owner operator program lease click here.

January Safety Snapshot – Distracted Driving

No Distracted Driving Sign, Red stop sign with words Distracted Driving and accident icon with stormy sky background

Of the more than 65,000 people killed in motor vehicle crashes over the past two years, one in ten crashes involved at least one distracted driver, according to police report data analyzed by Erie Insurance in the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS), a nationwide census of fatal motor vehicle traffic crashes maintained by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, (NHTSA). Erie Insurance consulted the NHTSA in its analysis, which pulled data from 2010 and 2011 police reports. Police listed the majority of drivers who were distracted as “generally distracted” or “lost in thought”.

“Distracted driving is any activity that takes your eyes off the road, your hands off the wheel, or your mind off your primary task of driving safely,” explains Doug Smith, senior vice president of personal lines at Erie Insurance.

Based on their analysis, Erie Insurance listed the 10 Deadliest Driving Distractions:

10. Smoking-related, includes lighting up, the act of smoking itself, using the ashtray or putting the cigarette out. When reviewing law enforcements officers’ notes in crash reports involving at least one fatality, Erie found that 1 percent cited smoking as the distraction.

9. Moving objects (pets or insects), dog owners know the perils of an agitated or overexcited Fido all too well. About 1 percent of police reports analyzed by Erie alluded to “moving objects”.

8. Using other device or controls integral to the vehicle, virtually any activity that can take your eyes off the road for even a split-second can put the driver and others in jeopardy. Seemingly innocent behaviors, such as adjusting mirrors, seats, or using an OEM navigation system accounted for another 1 percent of fatal distractions.

7. Adjusting audio or climate controls, Two percent of distracted drivers admitted that switching radio stations or adjusting the volume or vehicle temperature led to a fatal mistake.

6. Eating or drinking, using any vehicle as a moving restaurant is risky business as well. Another two percent of distracted drivers were either eating or drinking when the fatal crash occurred.

5. Using or reaching for a device brought into the vehicle, such as a navigational device, headphones, etc. Drivers who attempted to reach for such devices accounted for another two percent as well.

4. Other vehicle occupants, talking with or looking at other people in the vehicle resulted in five percent of distracted drivers involved in fatal crashes.

3. Outside person, object or event (such as rubbernecking), it’s difficult to resist temptation to gawk at off-road drama or post wreck cleanup, but 7 percent of the distracted drivers in Erie’s report should have.

2. Cell phone use (talking, listening, dialing, texting), a slew of legislation has been aimed to deter operating a cell phone while driving. Several states and municipalities have banned the use of hand-held cell phones while driving. It’s against the law in the city of Missoula to use a hand held device while driving.

Text messaging while driving (TWD) specifically is one of the most dangerous distractions and is illegal in 39 states. Many young adult drivers erroneously believe they can safely TWD but the numbers indicate otherwise. This offense accounted for 12 percent of fatal driving distractions in Erie’s report. The national epidemic has sparked a “driving while intoxicated “public awareness campaign, after studies revealed that TWD is about six times more likely to cause an accident than driving intoxicated. The NHTSA has also likened TWD to “driving after consuming four beers.” Other sobering statistics suggest TWD causes 1,600,000 accidents per year (National Safety Council); 30,000 injuries per year (Harvard Center for Risk Analysis Study); and 11 teen deaths in the U.S. each day (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Fatality Facts). 1. Generally distracted or “lost in thought”, detaching from reality can prove useful when recharging creative energies or simply taking

Other sobering statistics suggest TWD causes 1,600,000 accidents per year (National Safety Council); 30,000 injuries per year (Harvard Center for Risk Analysis Study); and 11 teen deaths in the U.S. each day (Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Fatality Facts). 1. Generally distracted or “lost in thought”, detaching from reality can prove useful when recharging creative energies or simply taking

1. Generally distracted or “lost in thought”, detaching from reality can prove useful when recharging creative energies or simply taking respite from a hectic day. However, doing so while driving can prove to be fatal. Driving “in a fog” or seemingly on autopilot is, above all, the riskiest driving behavior cited in Erie’s report. According to the insurer, daydreamers accounted for a whopping 62 percent of distracted drivers involved in road fatalities.

When we review our crashes, we’re quite sure that a “Distraction” of some type was a contributory factor in every crash. As a Professional Driver there is no place in the cab of your truck for distractions or complacency.

Be Driven By Safety!

Trucking Makes Montana Holidays Possible

d000426bb090c4b63f14b39c1e4288b2Written by: Barry Stang

Dining room tables set for a family feast. Storefront displays brimming with gifts to exchange with loved ones. Communities and friends joining together for holiday traditions. Bright lights on downtown trees and wreaths on doors.

These are just some of the images I think about when the holiday season is upon us. And no matter who you are, which holidays you celebrate, or where you’re from, all of these images share something in common – they’re all made possible by trucking.

The fact is, trucking touches every aspect of the holidays – and it goes beyond stocking grocery store shelves or delivering that perfect gift. In Montana, 65 percent of communities depend exclusively on trucks to move their goods. In addition to providing all those goods and cargo, trucking keeps your family members moving on the roads for that special time together by ensuring our gas stations are amply stocked with fuel.

The trucking industry is proud to deliver the holidays, and we recognize the enormous responsibility that comes with it. When more than 100 million drivers are on the road this season – as AAA forecasted for year-end holidays last year – they’ll be driving alongside nearly 3.5 million professional truck drivers, with 6,210 drivers in Montana alone. That’s why professional truck drivers are trained and dedicated to ensuring the safety of all motorists on the road, and why the industry as a whole invests $9.5 billion each year in safety. The investment spans all facets of trucking safety, including driver training, compliance with safety rules, on-board safety technology, and awards and bonus pay for improved safety performances.

There’s no doubt that the investment is paying off. The U.S. Department of Transportation reports that trucks have a crash rate that is 28 percent lower than that of other vehicles. The fatal crash rate has fallen 74 percent since 1980, and that figure has dropped 17 percent in the last decade alone. Further, trucks are principally at fault in only 25 percent of fatal car-truck crashes. This improvement comes even as the trucking industry is expanding, by operating an additional 2.7 million trucks and driving billions of additional miles each year.

In addition to keeping our roads safe – during the holidays and throughout the year – trucking works to better our communities. Many families and organizations answer a call to service during the holiday season, and the trucking industry is no exception.

From safety to service, the trucking industry is dedicated to ensuring the holidays happen for all of us. It’s the only industry that can say it directly ships to every community in America, helping to make this time of the year brighter for all families – snow, sleet, rain or shine. Professional truck drivers sacrifice time with their own families to ensure our gifts are delivered, our tables are set, and our roads are safe – a true embodiment of the holiday spirit.

Barry “Spook” Stang is executive vice president of Motor Carriers of Montana.

CVSA Releases 2016 Brake Safety Week Results

brakeinspectionweekCommercial motor vehicle enforcement members of the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance conducted 18,385 CMV and brake system inspections during Brake Safety Week, Sept. 11-17, 2016. Inspectors reported 13.2% of inspections with out-of-service brake violations and 14.8% of inspections with non-brake related out-of-service violations, each inclusive of some with violations in both categories.

During the week-long annual brake safety campaign, local, state, provincial, territorial and federal inspectors throughout the United States and Canada conducted inspections to identify out-of-adjustment brakes and brake systems violations. Roadside inspections included inspection of brake system components to identify loose or missing parts; air or hydraulic fluid leaks; cracked damaged or worn linings, pads, drums or rotors; and other faulty brake system components.

Inspectors also checked anti-lock braking system malfunction indicator lamps for compliance with jurisdictional regulations, an effort that was begun during CVSA’s unannounced Brake Check Day in May. Participating jurisdictions reported the number of trucks and buses with anti-lock braking systems as well as ABS violations observed.

The ABS survey for 2016 Brake Safety Week found the following:

Trucks

  • 93.2% of air-braked trucks (including tractors) inspected and 90.4% of hydraulic brakes trucks inspected required ABS, based on their date of manufacture.
  • 89.4% of air-braked trailers inspected required ABS, based on their date of manufacture.
  • 8.8% of ABS-required, air braked trucks and 8.8 percent ABS-required, hydraulic-braked trucks were found with ABS violations.

Trailers

  • 15.8% of trailers requiring ABS were found with ABS violations.
  • 7.6% of trailers inspected were not air- or hydraulic-braked and therefore not subject to ABS requirements.

“Brakes must be routinely checked and properly maintained to ensure the safety of the commercial motor vehicle, the CMV driver and everyone else on the road,” said Julius Debuschewitz of Yukon Highways and Public Works, CVSA president. “Although brake inspections are a part of the Level I inspections conducted by our hard-working CMV inspectors every day, Brake Safety Week is an opportunity to remind motor carriers and drivers of the importance of brake health and safety, and it provides the opportunity for our inspectors to conduct targeted and focused inspections to identify and remove commercial motor vehicles that have brakes with critical violations from our roadways.”

Brake Safety Week is part of the Operation Airbrake Program sponsored by CVSA in partnership with FMCSA and the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators. The Operation Airbrake Program is an international enforcement activity dedicated to preventing large truck and bus crashes, and saving lives throughout North America. The campaign seeks to highlight the importance of proper brake inspection and maintenance in an effort to reduce the number of brake-related violations discovered during a roadside inspection.

Safe Winter Driving Tips

Wibigstock-snow-calamity-11765876-smnter can be  a dangerous time to be on the roadway even for the most experienced drivers out there. Winter driving crash statistics from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) show that slippery roads are no joke.  24% of weather-related vehicle crashes occur on snowy, slushy, or icy pavements, 15 % of weather-related vehicle crashes happen during snowfall or sleet, and more than 1,300 people are killed and 116,800 people are injured in vehicle crashes on snowy, slushy, or icy pavements each year. To help you avoid being part of one of those statistics here are some tips to help you prepare and stay safe this winter.

  1. Buckle Up!
  2. Make sure your vehicle is in good condition before each trip. Taking a little time before trips and during stops to check your vehicle’s condition can make a big difference:
    • Clean all snow and ice from your vehicle, especially the hood, roof, trunk, lights and windows.
    • Do a hands-on inspection of tires, wiper blades, fluids, and lights.
    • Maintain at least a half tank of gas at all times during the winter season.
  3. Carry a winter driving kit. Keep your winter driving kit close by and stock it with:
    • Proper clothing (loose layers, extra gloves, rain gear)
    • A flashlight and batteries
    • A blanket
    • Non-perishable food and water
    • A first aid kit and any requires prescription medication
    • A bag of sand, salt, or kitty litter
    • Extra washer fluid
    • A windshield scraper and brush for snow removal
    • Jumper cables
    • Tire chains
    • Cell phone and charger
  4. Start a little slower, drive a little slower. Compensate for poor traction by increasing following distance, driving slower, and making all changes gently. A slower speed gives you more time to react if something occurs in the roadway ahead. Extra patience and awareness of other drivers can go a long way this time of year.
  5. Brake and accelerate slowly. Avoid sudden stops and starts in icy or rainy weather. If you need to slow down quickly in slippery conditions, try putting light pressure on your brakes using just the ball of your foot, keeping your heel on the floor. If an ABS is equipped this reduces your chance of locking your tires and losing control of your vehicle.
  6. Take evasive action to avoid road hazards and collisions. You may need to take evasive action to avoid a collision. At speeds above 25 mph, gentle deceleration and steering around obstacles is better than braking alone because less distance is required to steer around an object that to brake to a stop. In slick conditions, sudden braking can lead to loss of control. The additional distance you have been keeping between other vehicles should give you more time to see and maneuver around obstacles and road hazards.
  7. Hold your steering wheel with confidence and control. Sudden, sharp movements can quickly cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Grip your steering wheel steadily and with a strong arm through ruts in the road, heavy wind, and on ice. Snowy or icy surfaces make steering difficult and require smooth, careful, precise movements of the steering wheel. Sudden movements of the steering wheel and excessive acceleration over ruts can cause your vehicle to go into a skid. Watch out for your trailer pushing you on curves and turns.
  8. Watch carefully for black ice. Hazardous icy road conditions can sneak up on you, so when the temperature gets close to freezing watch out for these clues:
    • Ice builds on your outside mirror arms or backs, antenna, or the top corners of your windshield.
    • Water spray from tires of vehicles in front of you suddenly stops, indicating an ice patch
    • Roadside trees and signs have a frosting of ice even though the road surface only looks wet.
  9. Give yourself extra space in front and behind. To give yourself enough room to move out of harm’s way in a sudden emergency, increase the distance between you and other vehicles and avoid driving in packs. The stopping distance required on ice at 0°F is twice the amount required at 32°F. Normal following distance should be increased to 8-10 seconds when driving on icy, slippery surfaces.
  10. Be Extra precaution when driving in mountains. Mountain weather in winter can be severe and can change rapidly. Be ready for wind gusts in exposed positions and be aware of emergency vehicles and snowplows. Watch for melting or hard packed snow and strong side winds as these can also cause loss of control. If at all possible, do not stop in avalanche zones and always obey posted rules. Tire chains or snow tires may be required for certain routes. Local signage should indicate this and most states have transportation radio station you can monitor with traffic and road condition updates in your trip area.
  11. If you find yourself in a skid:
    • Come off the throttle
    • Brake Lightly
    • Attempt to maintain control of the trailer
  12. Don’t ask your truck to do more than it can. If you don’t feel comfortable driving for any reason, Don’t drive. Don’t push your luck if conditions are bad – yours and others’ lives are at the top of the priority list.  Take this time to make a safe stop and wait the storm out. Catch up on some rest to get back on the road when you determine it is safe to do so.

 

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.

Meals For 18 Wheels Is Gearing Up For The Holidays

1511703_560839657339537_503948183_nWith the holiday season at our doors, Meals for 18 wheels has been busy gearing up for the rush. Meals for 18 Wheels, an organization that serves hot meals to truck drivers in need, is preparing for its fourth holiday season.  Crystal Schoonmaker, who started Meals for 18 Wheels, said the organization served 395 home-cooked meals to truck drivers last Thanksgiving and anticipates similar numbers this year.

Schoonmaker is well aware of the sacrifices drivers make as her husband, father, aunt, two uncles and brother have all been trucker drivers. “If a driver finds themselves stranded because they’re broke down or they don’t have access to food where they’re at or they have a financial setback, they can message the page and we will access our volunteers that we already have information for in the drivers’ area and we’ll make contact with them and exchange information so the drivers can get fed that day,” Schoonmaker said. “If not, we’ll put a post on our Facebook page and hopefully someone will come through.” The group consists of 1,500 volunteers across the United States.

“We’re setting aside Thanksgiving and the Friday (Nov. 24-25) for the holiday sharing, “Schoonmaker said. “For the rest of the weekend, we’re going to play that by ear. If something arises during the weekend, we’ll definitely be available to try and get a driver a home-cooked meal.”

While Thanksgiving and Christmas are the group’s busiest times of the year, Meals for 18 Wheels is a year-round operation. The group typically provides meals to several drivers each week.

“The past year has been busy,” she said. “At the beginning of the year, we were really busy. We were getting drivers that needed help almost every day. Recently, it’s slowed down a bunch. I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad thing, but I’m leaning toward that it’s a good thing.

“We’re thankful that there may be less of a need, but some new drivers might not know we’re here. Hopefully, we can get the word out to everyone. We definitely want everyone to know that we’re still here, we’re still active, and we’re still doing this.”

Drivers in need of a meal can contact Meals for 18 Wheels on its Facebook page or by emailing MealsFor18Wheels@gmail.com. Individuals who’d like to volunteer can apply here. The group is thin on volunteers in Nebraska, Kansas, Washington and Nevada.

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.

Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse Rule Leaves OMB

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) received its final rule for DOT Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse back from the White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on October 31, 2016. The rule, “Commercial Drivers’ License Drug and Alcohol Clearinghouse (MAP-21).” Has been under OMB’s review since May 20,2016.

drug-test-ts-2

This rulemaking, according to the agency abstract, would create a central database for verified positive controlled substance and alcohol test results for CDL holders and refusals by such drivers to submit to testing. The clearinghouse would require carriers to submit positive tests and refusals to the database, and owner-operators must also report to FMCSA the consortium or third-party drug test administrator it uses and authorize it to submit information on any of its drivers, including themselves to the database.

The OMB gave the rule a “consistent with change” ruling, which means the rule is cleared to be published with changes recommended by OMB. Those recommendations were not published, and the final text of the rule won’t be known until it’s published in the Federal Register. FMCSA proposed the rule in February 2014, and it has been long sought after by many in trucking.

Speaking at the 2016 ATA Management Conference and Exhibition last month, Jack Van Steenburg, chief safety officer and assistant administrator for FMCSA, called the rule “a winner for the industry.”

“It really prevents job hopping,” he said. “It’s a tool for all of us.”

 

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.

ELD Mandate Upheld

eld-by-james-2016-05-03-13-23-768x553After hearing oral arguments September 13, the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals voted unanimously yesterday, October 31, to uphold the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) final rule mandating electronic logging devices or ELDs in commercial trucks. The rule will now go into effect on December 18, 2017. The decision does not change the rule’s exemption for pre-2000 year-model trucks, which are allowed to operate without an ELD. The mandate affects an estimated 3 million interstate drivers of vehicles manufactured after model year 2000.

The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA) filed a lawsuit on behalf of two truckers in March in an attempt to have the mandate overturned. But OOIDA was unable to convince the court of its arguments that the rule violates truckers’ Fourth Amendment rights to privacy. OOIDA also claimed the rule didn’t meet standards set by Congress for an ELD mandate an argument the court also rejected.  OOIDA had hoped its legal challenge would result in the rule being vacated a second time.

The rule “is not arbitrary or capricious, nor does it violate the Fourth Amendment,” the 7th circuit judges wrote in their decision. The decision was issued by circuit judges William Bauer, Michael Kanne and David Hamilton. The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the same court that tossed out FMCSA’s 2010-publishes ELD mandate on the grounds that the rule didn’t do enough to protect truckers from harassment by carriers via the devices.

In response to the ruling, OOIDA President and CEO Jim Johnston said: “We are disappointed and strongly disagree with the court’s ruling. Because this issue is of vital importance to our members and all small business truckers, we are reviewing our next steps to continue our challenge against this regulation.” The American Trucking Associations, whose Deputy General Counsel Rich Pianka had been pretty confident that the judges wouldn’t overturn the rule, expressed pleasure at the outcome, saying through a spokesman: “ATA is pleased that the court has cleared the way for this important regulation and we look forward to its implementation.”

The 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the highest court in the country next to the Supreme Court OOIDA still has the option to appeal the ruling to the Supreme Court.

 

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.

Autonomous Truck Makes First Commercial Delivery

uber-makes-first-autonomous-beer-run-with-self-driving-delivery-truckThe path toward a “driverless truck” is full of firsts many of which have yet to take place. But this week the movement cleared one of its most significant hurdles to date – actually making an autonomous delivery. If you’re in Colorado Springs, you might buy a can of beer that was shipped by a self-driving truck.

Otto, the self-driving truck company acquired by Uber, announced Tuesday, October 25, that one of its heavy-duty self-driving trucks completed a 120-mile delivery for Anheuser-Busch InBev. The Class 8 tractor and its trailer loaded with 51,744 cans of beer, traveled on Interstate 25 from Fort Collins through downtown Denver to Colorado Springs. There was a driver tucked in the sleeper berth who monitored the two-hour voyage.

The truck, a Volvo VNL, used cameras, radar, and LIDAR sensors to see the road. Otto’s system controlled the trucks acceleration, braking and steering to carry the beer exit to exit with no human intervention. Otto co-founder Lior Ron says the truck’s driver was out of the driver’s seat for the entire 120 mile trek down interstate 25 and monitored the system from the sleeper. All the driver had to do was drive the truck onto the interstate and take over as it left the interstate to its final destination at the distributor about two hours later.

“This shipment is the next step towards our vision for a safe and productive future across our highways,” Otto executives wrote in a blog post. “With an Otto-equipped vehicle, truck drivers will have the opportunity to rest during long stretches of highway while the truck continues to drive and make money for them.”

Despite having less than 200 miles and only one delivery of feedback, James Sembrot, senior director of logistics strategy for Anheuser-Busch, says he was thrilled with the results and says he’s confident Otto’s autonomous retrofit will improve safety, will be sustainable and will increase operating efficiency. “We really see that as the model of the future,” he says. “The driver is still there, he’s just safer with those very long hours on the road and he can be more productive because you could [potentially] drive around the clock.” Hours of Service obstacles remain, as does the fact that Level 4 autonomy, the level at which once the system is enabled, driver attention is not required – is still not legal in most states, including Colorado.

In case you’re wondering, the historical significance of this week’s beer run didn’t come with a price premium. Sembrot says Anheuser-Busch paid “the market rate average of what we normally pay on that lane.” Autonomy’s impact on rates won’t be seen for quite some time but Ron says, rates aside, platforms like Otto’s create an environment where everyone can make more money.

“There is a very clear commercial value with the investment because you can drive more hours on the truck and be more cost effective with the assets on the truck because the truck behaves more predictably,” he says. “We think this creates a win-win for both shipper, the carrier and the driver. We are creating a bigger pie.”

“Carriers pass on to shippers the cost of fuel via a fuel surcharge,” Sembrot adds. “We know this technology is going to improve fuel consumption … and we expect to realize a benefit of reduced cost of fuel.”

“As a shipper, we are convinced this is the future,” he adds.

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.

FMCSA Issues Safety Advisory For Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Phones.

23119The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) issued a safety advisory this week regarding the recently –recalled Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smart phone and its lithium-ion batteries. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), the lithium- ion battery in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7s can overheat and catch fire, posing a serious burn and fire hazard.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 7 has been subject of two major recalls as a result of reports of the smartphone exploding and lighting on fire leading to injuries and damages. After an initial recall failed to solve the problem, Samsung has told retailers globally to stop selling and issuing replacement Galaxy Note 7 phones.  The recall affects nearly two million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones.

Samsung has received 96 reports of batteries in Samsung Galaxy Note 7 phones overheating in the United States, including 23 new reports since the original September 15, 2016, recall announcement. Samsung has received 13 reports of burns and 47 reports of property damage associated with Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones.

The FMCSA is following in the Federal Aviation Administration’s footsteps, which banned the phones from all commercial flights on Oct. 14. While the FMSCA does not have the authority to ban commercial drivers or passengers from carrying the phones they are recommending that all persons who wish to carry these devices on a CMV, including motor coaches, take the following precautions:

  • Turn off the device.
  • Disconnect the device from any charging equipment.
  • Disable all applications that could inadvertently activate the phone (e.g. alarm clock)
  • Protect the power switch to prevent its unintentional activation.
  • Keep the device in carry-on baggage or on your person. Do not store in an inaccessible baggage compartment.

FMCSA adds the phones are subject to the regulatory prohibition in the Federal Hazardous Materials Regulations, which states transporting electrical devices, such as batteries and battery-powered devices, likely to create sparks is prohibits, unless they are packaged to prevent sparking . The agency adds the phones can only be transported as cargo with a special permit or approval issued by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

Click here to read the full advisory.

While Davis Transport Inc., is one of the leading flatbed freight carriers in the nation, we consider ourselves a company built for flatbed owner operators by flatbed owner operators. Our flatbed lease purchase program has facilitated hundreds of truckers’ transition from employee to business ownership. To learn more about our flatbed lease purchase program lease click here.